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Understanding the Benefits of PGS and PGD for IVF Treatments

Introduction: Understanding the various tests and procedures with IVF is crucial to increasing the chances of a successful treatment. In this article, we will delve into the world of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) and Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS), shedding light on their intricacies and discussing how they can impact your IVF journey. From uncovering potential genetic diseases to identifying abnormalities in embryos, we will explore the benefits and considerations of these genetic tests, providing you with the knowledge to make informed decisions regarding your fertility treatment.

Understanding PGS and PGD in IVF Treatments

When beginning in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments, fertility doctors often conduct various tests to detect fertility issues and assess current health. Two recommended tests are PGS and PGD.

Doctor & Team from First Fertility Clinic

Doctor & Team from First Fertility Clinic

What Is Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD)?

PGD is a genetic test used to identify genes that may increase the risk of passing certain genetic diseases to a child. It can also detect abnormalities in embryos. This screening is particularly suggested for couples with a family history of specific genetic diseases, helping doctors avoid using abnormal embryos and increasing the chance of successful IVF.

PGD looks for chromosomal translocations and more than 4,000 single-gene disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and cystic fibrosis. It’s a complex and expensive screening process, but it may help detect abnormalities that could lead to miscarriages or other complications.

If you’ve experienced miscarriages or complications during embryo transfer, PGD may be used to identify the healthiest embryos. It’s a costly but potentially beneficial tool in selecting embryos with fewer abnormalities or genetic diseases.

What Is Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS)?

Like PGD, PGS helps detect potential issues affecting the chances of successful IVF. However, it focuses on determining whether embryos have the correct number of chromosomes, as abnormality in chromosome count is a leading cause of miscarriages and failed IVF treatments.

PGS aims to isolate healthy embryos for transfer at a lower cost compared to PGD.

PGS is an alternative to PGD, especially for those looking to identify healthy embryos for transfer. It’s a more cost-effective option and can be useful for individuals seeking to increase their chances of successful IVF.

The PGS can be used by any woman that wants to increase her chances of getting pregnant through IVF. While it can be used to eliminate embryos that carry a higher risk of miscarriage due to abnormalities, it can also be used to find the best embryos for the IVF treatment.

It should be noted that this test typically requires about five embryos. For women with a lower ovarian reserve, the PGS may be difficult. You may need to complete an additional IVF treatment so that your body can grow more embryos for the PGS.

Main Differences Between PGD and PGS

The PGS test is often recommended for couples that want to improve the outcome of the IVF process. However, the costly PGD is typically reserved for couples that have dealt with recurrent pregnancy loss or fertility issues.

The PGS has limitations. It does not screen for specific disorders. It also does not look at every chromosome. However, it can be effective at eliminating the use of embryos when chromosomal abnormalities are detected. PGS can also determine the sex of the embryo, which may be used to allow parents to select the sex of the embryos that are transferred to the uterus.

The PGD test can look for specific genetic disorders. It helps detect mutations that may be the result of recessive genes. The PGD is often recommended for those that have a family history of specific disorders.

Talk to Your Fertility Specialists about PGS and PGD

If you would like to learn more about either of these genetic tests, you should discuss PGS and PGD with your fertility specialists. Depending on your specific situation, your doctors may recommend these tests to locate the healthiest embryos for use in the IVF process.

PGD and PGS can also rule out the possibility of specific genetic diseases that may decrease your chances of getting pregnant. However, they may also find abnormalities in your embryos, which can be used to help find the best embryos for implantation. In the end, the decision is yours to make.

Keep in mind that both tests can be costly and should not be taken without exploring your options. These tests may also harm the embryo, especially when performed by an unqualified embryologist.

If you are considering using either of these tests, you should first ensure that you are working with a reliable team of fertility specialists. Before choosing to undergo either test, talk to your doctors to ensure that you understand what these tests may or may not do.

Conclusion: Understanding the benefits of PGS and PGD for IVF treatments is crucial to making informed decisions about your fertility journey. Whether you are considering these tests due to recurrent pregnancy loss, family history of genetic diseases, or desire to improve the chances of a successful IVF, it’s important to consult with your fertility specialists. While these tests can be valuable in identifying healthy embryos, they come with potential risks and financial implications. Your doctors can guide you in weighing the pros and cons and help you make the best choice for your unique situation.

FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions

PGD is a genetic test used to detect genes that may increase the likelihood of passing certain genetic diseases to your child, as well as to identify abnormalities in embryos.

2. Who Should Consider Using PGD?

PGD is recommended for couples with a family history of specific genetic diseases or those who have experienced one or more miscarriages or complications during embryo transfer.

3. What Is Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS)?

PGS helps to detect potential issues that may decrease the chances of successful IVF by determining whether embryos contain the right amounts of chromosomes, a factor that contributes to miscarriages and failed IVF treatments.

4. Who Should Consider Using PGS?

PGS can be used by any woman looking to increase her chances of getting pregnant through IVF, particularly to isolate healthy embryos for transfer.

5. What Are the Main Differences Between PGD and PGS?

PGD is often recommended for couples with recurrent pregnancy loss or fertility issues, as it can look for specific genetic disorders, while PGS is beneficial for improving the outcome of the IVF process by identifying chromosomal abnormalities and ensuring the use of healthy embryos.

6. Should I Discuss PGS and PGD with My Fertility Specialists?

Yes, it is advisable to discuss PGS and PGD with your fertility specialists to understand if these tests are suitable for locating the healthiest embryos for use in the IVF process and to rule out the possibility of specific genetic diseases that may decrease chances of conception.

7. What Are the Considerations Before Using PGD or PGS?

Prior to using either test, ensure you are working with a reliable team of fertility specialists, discuss the potential risks and benefits, and understand the implications of these tests on your embryos, both financially and medically.

  • Published on : Monday November 5, 2018
  • Last updated : Saturday June 29, 2024
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About the author

Michelle Tan is an IVF Consultant with 12 years of experience in fertility consulting. Having personally undergone IVF and surrogacy, she brings firsthand insight and empathy to her work. Based in Singapore, Michelle frequently travels to clinics in Bangkok, Phnom Penh, and Bishkek, sharing her expertise and supporting patients on their fertility journeys.